2022 goals, New year resolution. Woman in white sweater writing Text 2022 goals in open notepad on the table. Start new year, planning and setting goals for the next year.

The Power of Persistence

Over the past month, I’ve been setting out the steps for turning your writing dreams into attainable goals:

1.  Set your dreams down in writing (The Power of Words);

2.  Create specific goals (The Power of Goals);

3.  Create a plan to reach your goals (The Power of a Plan);

4.  Focus on one goal at a time (The Power of Focus).

And now:

5.  Reaffirm your goals on a daily basis and never give up. This is the power of persistence, and it’s the final and best step in any successful plan to reach a goal.

“You don’t start out writing good stuff. You start out writing crap and thinking it’s good stuff. And then gradually, you get better at it. That’s why I say the most valuable trait is persistence.” –Octavia E. Butler

Once you’ve set a goal for yourself and designed a plan for reaching it, the secret to getting there is to keep going and never give up. Take steps toward that goal each and every day. In football terms, keep moving the ball forward. You might periodically re-evaluate your goals and re-work them or revise them, but never forsake them. As long as you keep moving toward your goals at a steady pace, you will eventually reach them.

I firmly believe persistence is the most powerful element in turning a vague dream for the future into a tangible goal. Some people in my family might call it stubbornness, but when I have a setback, I generally (after the appropriate amount of whining) try and try again.

To be persistent, you have to be ready to weather periods of discouragement. I assure you there will be days when you return to your previous, negative patterns of thinking and convince yourself you will never achieve your dreams. The key is to be tenacious, to ride out those bad days, and to wake up the next morning with renewed resolve.

“Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent.” –Calvin Coolidge

Let’s take quitting smoking as an example. Some smokers joke, “I can quit smoking whenever I want. I’ve quit 236 times!” It’s kinda funny and sorta sad because it plays on how addictive tobacco is. But actually, quitting smoking over and over again is the key to eventually kicking the cigarette habit for good. Quitting smoking is an area where persistence really pays off. Studies show that the more times a smoker tries to quit smoking, the more likely it is they will eventually quit for good.

So, if quitting smoking is your goal, it’s possible you may quit smoking for a couple of weeks and then relapse and smoke a cigarette, or two cigarettes, or even binge on a full pack of cigarettes. The key to eventually kicking the habit for good is persistence. This means not using relapse as an excuse—give it your best effort without keeping relapse in mind as a possibility. But if you do relapse and smoke again, don’t give up. Wake up the next morning resolved to quit again. And again. And again. Until you get it right. You resolve to quit smoking every single day, however many times it takes, until it sticks.

It’s the same with any goal. For example, if you dream of becoming debt free, your first goal might be to freeze your level of debt by developing the habit of not incurring new debt. Your second goal might be to reduce spending to free up more cash to repay your debts. Your third goal might be to start an emergency savings account so that you aren’t forced to borrow when life’s emergencies come along. A fourth goal might be to earn a little extra income so you can pay off your debts more quickly.

You will likely face some setbacks, especially in the beginning. You might have to charge a necessary auto repair to a credit card because you don’t yet have enough in savings to cover it. You may spend unbudgeted money on dinner out because you haven’t yet developed a strong habit of planning ahead for meals at home. You might skip a deposit to your new savings account in favor of buying those fabulous new shoes with the kitten heels you saw in the Avanti store window. The key is not to be perfect. The key is to keep trying in the face of obstacles and to forgive yourself for mistakes. The fastest path to giving up is to dwell on past mistakes until you are too discouraged to keep trying.

“First forget inspiration. Habit is more dependable. Habit will sustain you whether you’re inspired or not. Habit will help you finish and polish your stories. Inspiration won’t. Habit is persistence in practice.” –Octavia E. Butler

Persistence is a secret weapon. Persistence will turn any dream into reality. This is especially true of writing dreams, because writing can be one hell of a rollercoaster and often consists of a whole lot of rejection. Artists often suffer from imposter syndrome–when you convince yourself you aren’t good enough or you don’t belong, it’s easy to convince yourself to abandon your dreams.

If you’re going to succeed as a writer, you have to develop a thick skin and learn to slough it off when you’re rebuffed. In the writing business, rejection is not personal. It’s just that—business. And it means nothing more than this: you haven’t yet found your perfect fit in terms of a market, agent, or publisher. Remember that your very best writing is perfect, just as it is, for someone.

Don’t listen to negative self-talk. Even more importantly, don’t listen to negative talk from others–it’s amazing to me that the most supportive friends and family members in a writer’s life often have no problem discouraging that writer’s dreams. Be determined, keep at it, never give up. If you do, you will eventually reach your goals. That’s a promise.

I return to this video time and again when I’m feeling discouraged. If nothing else, it puts a smile on my face:

WRITER TIP: Keep trying. Persistence is nothing more than trying over and over and over again. How do you become persistent? You get up every morning and do it again. The more days you do that, the more proud of yourself you’ll be, and the easier it will be to do it again the next day. Another good idea which I’ll blog about soon is to develop a plan for those days when you’re not feeling very tenacious or motivated. What can you do today toward your goal, even if you don’t feel like doing anything?

The Power of Focus

I’m a big fan of dreaming without limits. But something I’ve learned the hard way is that, if you ever want to reach your dream life, it’s important to focus your efforts.

Focus, visualization, and determination are powerful tools that will help you to reach even the most seemingly impossible goals. Rather than spreading yourself too thin and going after many goals at once, prioritize; focus on one or two of your most important goals, and put your time, energy, and effort into achieving those goals.

The power of focus is that, once you set your mind on a particular goal and keep that goal in your sights each and every day, you will suddenly find yourself moving toward that goal in leaps and bounds. It’s amazing! You will achieve your goal much more rapidly than you ever will if you go after your goals in a scattered way or give them only a fraction of your time and attention. I know it sounds simplistic, but all things being equal, it’s true.

Also, once you achieve the first goal, you’ll have a powerful affirmation of your abilities … and of future possibilities. Achieving one goal will set into motion a cycle of success after success, and you will soon be checking goals off your list right and left.

Here’s an example: I once dreamed of living near the beach in a place with an ocean view. At the time, I was living in a home I had purchased some years earlier in a hot, dry, mountainous area of the county, about thirty miles inland from the beach. I was unhappy for many reasons, but location and weather was one of them. I have always been happier when I can walk on the beach and am in a cooler climate. It improves my health, relieves stress, and puts me in a better frame of mind.

The house was badly in need of repairs before it could be put on the market, and there were lots of other obstacles standing in my way as well. I didn’t have the money or the necessary skills to make repairs. I was depressed and unmotivated. There was so much to do before I would ever be able to live my dream life. It seemed impossible and overwhelming at the time. I felt stuck.

But to be honest, the biggest obstacle was that I was doing nothing to move toward my goal, other than vaguely wishing each and every day of my life that things were different. I finally realized I had to start moving toward my goal in some small way or I would be stuck forever. My dream wasn’t going to happen all on its own—I had to do something to make it happen.

I made a list and decided that selling my house in the mountains was the first thing I needed to do in order to begin moving toward my bigger goal of living closer to the beach. So, I decided to focus on that goal, and that goal only, and to forget the rest for the time being. As the old saying goes, “How do you move a mountain? One rock at a time.”

One obstacle was the fact that I was a working single mom, with limited time to focus on much more than getting through each day. Also, it’s hard to get yourself moving when you’re depressed. I had to put some serious time management skills to work in order to reach my goals. Once I’d organized my time a little better, I reminded myself each morning on my drive to work that my only current goal was to get that home sold. I stopped thinking about all the rest and focused on that one goal. Every evening on my drive home from work, I thought about what I could do that evening to move toward my goal.

For the time being, I didn’t allow myself to get overwhelmed by thinking beyond selling that house. I reminded myself that I was wholeheartedly committed to reaching that goal and made a list of the things I needed to do to get there. During evenings and weekends, I began doing something, anything, no matter how small, toward the goal of selling my house. I began painting, doing yard work, and making whatever small repairs I could do on my own. I began investigating what was needed for the larger repairs and researching costs. I began familiarizing myself with the housing market in my area and making phone calls to realtors about putting the house up for sale. I started getting the word out.

The power of focus is amazing. Within one month after I began putting all of my time, energy, and effort into the single-minded goal of selling the house, my next-door neighbor called me. He told me he’d heard through the grapevine I was interested in selling. He offered to buy the house in its current condition. Escrow closed within a month after he first called. During escrow, I started looking for a new place to live.

Less than two months from the day I made my decision to focus on selling the house, I was living in a townhouse less than a block from the beach with views looking out over the ocean. Some people may think that this was mere luck, and they may be partly right. But, I strongly believe we have to help luck along with our own efforts. Had I not started moving toward the goal of repairing and selling the house, I have no doubt I’d still be sitting in that house feeling sorry for myself.

Once the original goal of selling the house was met, my other goals began to fall into place. Had I continued to look only at the big picture, had I continued to be overwhelmed and paralyzed by the enormity of everything I wanted to accomplish, I would never have been able to accomplish anything. By focusing totally and completely on one goal at a time, I was able to achieve a number of big goals in a matter of a couple of months. This is the power of focus.

What does this have to do with writing? you may ask. Everything. I didn’t start making progress as a writer until I started pursuing my writing goals with the same focus I used to sell my house. Two and a half years ago, I hadn’t published a thing. I saw other writers I knew posting on social media about their publications, and I couldn’t imagine myself ever getting there. My dream of being a published writer was a hazy one. But when I started focusing on one goal at a time and taking small actions toward my writing goals each and every day, things started to happen. Before I knew it, one writing dream after another became a reality.

WRITER TIP: From your list of goals for 2022, pick one writing goal to focus on. Make it a habit to think about your goal for a few seconds every morning when you wake up and again every night before you go to sleep–remind yourself that this is your focus for now. Try to do something small each day to move toward your goal. Your dream life may seem far away, but you can change your entire life one goal at a time.

The Power of a Plan

Last week, I wrote about setting goals for your writing and mentioned a famous quote from Yogi Berra: “If you don’t know where you’re going, you’ll end up somewhere else.”

A man, a plan, a canal—Panama. This is much more than my daughter’s favorite palindrome. It’s a blueprint for success.

When Theodore Roosevelt dreamed of building a canal through Panama, he didn’t just pick up a shovel and start digging a ditch. He seized an opportunity and made a plan. French efforts to build the canal had failed miserably. After years of digging, the French had spent nearly $300 billion on the canal. 20,000 French lives had been lost in the work. After all of this, the French had only 11 miles of canal to show for their effort. When the French abandoned the canal effort in 1888, Theodore Roosevelt saw an opportunity to fulfill his dream of building a canal across Panama.

In 1902, after becoming President of the United States, Roosevelt negotiated the purchase of the canal property from France. He then came up with a plan. Roosevelt first studied the reasons the French effort to build a canal had failed. He then used what he had learned to create a workable plan which included addressing the previous obstacles to building a canal across Panama. He negotiated a treaty with the country of Panama and obtained their permission to build the canal, as well as their cooperation. He enlisted the financial backing of some of America’s richest and most powerful citizens, including J.P. Morgan. Roosevelt then organized a building effort and hired qualified people to oversee various aspects of the construction. He hired Chief Engineer John Stevens, who designed a plan to clean up the canal zone. He hired Dr. William Gorgas to oversee sanitation, including the eradication of disease-carrying mosquitos. He provided workers with comfortable housing and good food. He later hired Stevens’s successor, Thomas Goethals, who carried on an organized and persistent building effort.

“If you don’t know where you’re going, you’ll end up somewhere else.” –Yogi Berra

In 1914, the Panama Canal was completed, forever revolutionizing international travel and trade. But Roosevelt laid a lot of groundwork before he started work on the canal. He visualized where he wanted to be, then he figured out how to get there.

Coming up with a plan is the first step to building your dream writing life. Where do you want to end up? Visualize your desired end result and work backward, writing down a list of steps to help you reach your goal. Then, pick something from your list you can do right now. Today. Do you want to write your first novel? Write down what they call in the movie industry a logline or tagline: In one or two sentences, what is your novel going to be about? Or start an outline–a map within a map! Are you writing a historical novel or a novel that will require some research? Spend an hour doing some preliminary research that will make beginning the writing of your novel easier. Do you want to get a short story published? Research ten “markets” (literary journals or magazines) where your story would be a good fit. Are you struggling with writing consistently? Set up a dedicated writing space and a writing schedule—will you write three pages each morning? or write for an hour each evening? Whatever it is, start building the habit of consistency.

Do your homework, decide what it will take to achieve your dream, and then map out a plan that will lead you to your ultimate destination. If you follow your map, you can’t help but reach your destination.

WRITER TIP: How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time. Goals can seem overwhelming when you only look at the big picture. “I want to publish a bestselling novel” is a daunting goal. But when you break it down into its tiny parts, you can get there, one step at a time. As novelist E.L. Doctorow said, “Writing a novel is like driving a car at night. You can see only as far as your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.”
Glowing lightbulb above the word "goals" spelled out in wooden blocks against a light blue background.

The Power of Goals

This is a case history. I’m sharing my long, arduous, and disjointed writing journey with you in the hopes you can skip to the good part.

I started writing short stories in elementary school.

In my teens, I shifted to writing very bad, very schmaltzy, very angsty poetry.

In my twenties: As an undergraduate at the University of California at Santa Cruz, I applied to the creative writing program. Before I got a response, my life shifted drastically, and I dropped out of college. I’ll never know if I would have been accepted.

I kept writing.

In my thirties: I submitted a short story to Redbook magazine. I got back a tiny, form rejection slip printed in red ink. When I read the “story” now, I realize it’s not even a story. It’s 5,000 words of me grieving the end of my marriage. But I cherished that rejection slip. I still have it. It’s proof of me putting myself out there.

I kept writing.

In my forties: I had an opportunity through a local writers’ conference to have a published author critique one of my stories. Catherine Ryan Hyde, the author of Pay it Forward, told me she liked my story. She said I had a natural understanding of story arc and that she was sure she would see one of my stories in print someday. Much better feedback than I’d gotten from Redbook. I was elated.

I kept writing.

image of a young woman writer at the table with typewriter, wearing glasses, suspenders and a bow tie, and a straw hat, and imaging words coming out of her typewriter.

In my fifties: I went back to college to finish my bachelor’s degree in English. I chose an emphasis in creative writing.

I kept writing.

And writing.

And writing.

But I didn’t submit anything for publication. Nothing. NOT. A. THING.

In my sixties: I graduated from the University of California at Riverside’s Palm Desert MFA program in Creative Writing and Writing for the Performing Arts. I know there’s a lot of debate about “to MFA or not to MFA,” but I think it depends a great deal on the program. At UCR Palm Desert, I not only learned to be a better writer, I learned how to focus my efforts. I began to approach my writing dreams the way I approached other things in my life. I set financial goals, health goals, career goals. Why wouldn’t I set writing goals, too?

In 2019, I submitted three pieces to various markets. One (a poem) was accepted and published in a fundraising anthology. One (an essay) was rejected. One (another essay) languished for a year—I withdrew it when it was accepted for publication elsewhere in 2020.

In 2020, I submitted to various literary journals and magazines eight times. Three times my pieces were rejected, three times my pieces were accepted, and twice my pieces were withdrawn when they were eventually accepted elsewhere. I fell far short of my goal, though. I’d gone into the year with a goal of racking up 100 rejections—a game strategy recommended by a peer who told me that, if I tried to rack up 100 rejections, I’d surely end up with at least a couple of acceptances. This made sense to me and appealed to my goal-oriented personality.

New Years Resolutions Goals motivational phrase in open notebook on the table. Outdoor still life with My Goals motivational text. Self-development and motivation.

In 2021, I decided to do things differently. Focusing on rejections wasn’t the right mindset for me, I realized. For one thing, it focused on the negative versus the positive. But for another, it was a goal I had little control over. I like being in control. Publishers take a long time to respond to submissions—I can’t control how many rejections come back to me in a year, so that goal isn’t giving me the kind of motivation I need. What I can control is how many things I send out into the world. So for 2021, I set a goal to reach 100 submissions. So far, I’m at 106 submissions for the year. Of those, I’ve had 49 rejections, two acceptances, and I withdrew one piece when it was accepted elsewhere. That leaves 54 submissions still out there as I head into the new year. This is what Catherine Ryan Hyde calls “keeping hope in the mail.”

If you’ve read this far, you’ll notice two things: (1) It’s never too late to pursue your writing dreams in earnest; and (2) things finally started to happen for me when I began setting specific, measured goals for my writing. In the years before now, I squeezed in writing when and where I could, but I wasn’t consistent about it, and I didn’t have any direction. I wasn’t disciplined. I read books, but I didn’t apply any of the things I was learning about writing from successful writers to my own writing. These things used to cause me a lot of remorse—I felt like I’d wasted so much time. But to be honest, nothing I wrote in my early years was anywhere close to ready. I needed all those years of practice. And I needed to learn to write.

But I also needed a sense of direction and to set goals. I never once considered where I was going with my writing—I just wrote and had vague dreams of publishing a book someday. I never stopped to think about how that was supposed to happen. I guess I figured a writing fairy godmother was going to drop in unannounced, find me scribbling away diligently, and reward me with a book deal. That’s not how it works.

My stats over the past three years don’t sound all that great. Out of 117 submissions, I’ve had six acceptances. Something like a five percent success rate. But let’s look at it this way: Out of the nineteen stories and essays I’ve been submitting, I’ve found homes for six of them. That’s the result of persistence, and that’s a thirty-two percent success rate. Plus I still have a whole lot of hope in the mail. And a whole new year ahead of me.

WRITER TIP: An exchange between Alice and the Cheshire Cat in Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland is famously paraphrased as: “If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will get you there.” Major League Baseball catcher and manager Yogi Berra said it better, I think: “If you don’t know where you’re going, you’ll end up someplace else.” While the writing itself is the most important thing, be sure to give some thought to where you want to go with your writing, and then set some goals to help you get there.
Table to with a notebook that says 2022 goals surrounded by an envelope on the left, a small holiday gift and sparkly ornament at the top, and a pen on the right.

The Power of Words

I gave up making New Year’s Resolutions a long time ago, but every December since the year 2000, I’ve made a list of goals for the coming year. I used to type them, but beginning in 2009, I started writing the lists down by hand in my “dream journal,” a separate journal that houses my dreams. In addition to my annual lists of goals, I keep other lists in my dream journal, like a list of places I want to visit and an extensive list of all the places I’ve lived since I was three years old. I also jot down little notes in my dream journal: observations, quotes, and things that move me, inspire me, or motivate me.

I’ve written down a list of anywhere from 10 to 25 goals each year for the past 20+ years. I’ve never once accomplished every goal on the list, but I’m okay with that. If I accomplish even half of them, I’ve still gotten somewhere. And over time, I’ve accomplished quite a lot. Some goals make the list for several years before I actually accomplish them. I first wrote “Earn Bachelor’s Degree” on my 2012 list. I didn’t go back to college until 2016, and I didn’t earn my bachelor’s degree until 2018. But I set that intention, and I kept writing it down and putting it into words until it came true. In 2016, I set a goal of submitting 12 short stories to literary journals. I didn’t accomplish that goal until this year. I’m still working on my goals to beat my best 5K time and to watch all of the Academy Award winners for Best Picture. I’ll get there someday. But the thing is, I’ve steadily made progress, and my life is considerably better than it was before I started writing my goals down.

As I begin to consider my goals for 2022, I find myself thinking about the power words have had in my life. The power of writing my goals down and setting my intentions for the future, yes. But also the power of the words others use to define me, and the power of the words I use to define myself. Like when I was in seventh grade, and I had to stand up in front of my English class and give an oral report on Virginia Dare. I was terrified. I wore a chocolate brown dress my mother made for me. My teacher wrote each of us a handwritten letter giving her feedback on our reports. At the end of mine, she wrote, “Brown is definitely your color!” As I write this nearly 50 years later, I still have that piece of paper tucked away somewhere, and I just realized I’m wearing my favorite chocolate brown sweater. The power of words.

Close up of notebook or journal with heading 2022 goals. A woman in a bulky oatmeal colored sweater and jeans is writing in the notebook.

When I was in fourth grade, my teacher sent me to the library to help with a kindergarten class. I sat cross-legged on the carpet with some of the children and read to them, then I helped them pick out library books. It wasn’t anything super memorable. In fact, I probably wouldn’t remember that afternoon at all except for two things: (1) It was the day I checked Island of the Blue Dolphins out of the library–I can still picture it displayed on a book easel on top of a shelf; and (2) when I left, the kindergarten teacher thanked me for my help and told me I showed a lot of “initiative.” I didn’t know what the word “initiative” meant. I had to go look it up in the dictionary. When I did, I felt a sense of pride. The kindergarten teacher had seen this awesome personality trait in me that I didn’t even know existed, let alone that I possessed.

To be honest, I’m not sure I really showed any initiative in the library that day. I was quiet and introverted as a child, and I don’t remember doing anything other than what I was sent there to do. But between my own teacher choosing me for the job and the kindergarten teacher complimenting me, that day was a boost to my self-esteem and helped to develop my character. If I didn’t have initiative when I left the library that day, I sure do have it now, many years later. I believed I had initiative, and so I displayed it at every opportunity. Today, this is a quality I really do have. That kindergarten teacher gave me a word that changed my life.

As an adult, I worked as a music promoter for a few years. One night, after I insisted a sleazy venue manager give my band the slot he’d promised, a famous rock musician told me I was tenacious. To be honest, up until that night, I hadn’t seen my unwillingness to give up or give in as a positive trait. I often saw it as obstinacy, a dogged and sometimes reckless refusal to get it through my thick skull that something wasn’t meant to be. But that night, when the musician told me I was tenacious and said it in an admiring way, I began to see myself differently. Sure, that kind of stubbornness meant I eventually failed at a lot of things. But it sometimes meant I persisted long enough to succeed, too.

Persistence and thick skins are things writers need. To keep writing and rewriting, trying to spill the things in your head out onto paper in such a way that others can see you, in such a way that other human beings know that you see them, is hard on the soul. To continue submitting your stories, little pieces of you, to literary journals day after day, and to be told they’re not wanted the overwhelming majority of the time, is hard on the heart. Out of the 49 submissions I’ve received responses to so far this year, 47 of those responses were rejections. It would be so easy to get discouraged and give up. I’ll admit it—sometimes I think it would be a relief to give up and do something else. Just about anything else.

But in those moments, I remember that scene in The Notebook when Noah tells Allie she’s a pain in the ass, and I know I’m made of stronger stuff than that. “I’m not afraid to hurt your feelings,” he says. “You have like a two-second rebound rate and you’re back doing the next pain in the ass thing.” This is me. I am tenacious. Or stubborn. Either way, literary journals aren’t afraid to hurt my feelings, and sure, it hurts to be rejected—for like two seconds. Then I get over it. I roll up the sleeves of my chocolate brown sweater, and I send them another story. Surely they’ll love this one.

As I put my goals into words this month and set my intentions for 2022, I’m going to keep in mind the power that words have, not only to help me set my course for the coming year, but to encourage me and keep me pushing forward. When it comes to pursuing a writing career, being stubborn is a good thing.

WRITER TIP: Start a dream journal. There is power in setting your intentions for the future, putting your goals into words, and writing your dreams for yourself down in ink. Each year, write your goals for that year in your dream journal. Write down specific, measurable goals, and cross them off as you achieve them. If you don’t reach a goal one year, move it to the next year, and keep setting that intention until you reach the goal. As the years go by and you look back at your lists, you’ll be amazed at how much you’ve accomplished.